Hearing Loss

HEARING LOSS


Hearing loss, is also known as hearing impairment is a partial or totally inability to hear. A deaf person has blittle to no hearing. Hearing loss may occur in one or both ears.

In children hearing problems can affect the ability to learn language and in adults it loss can be temporary or permanent.



Causes Of Hearing Loss


    Age

There is a progressive loss of ability to hear high frequencies with aging known as presbycusis. For men, this can start as early as 25 and women at 30. Although genetically variable it is a normal concomitant of ageing and is distinct from hearing losses caused by noise exposure, toxins or disease agents.Common conditions that can increase the risk of hearing loss in elderly people are high blood pressure, diabetes or the use of certain medications harmful to the ear.While everyone loses hearing with age, the amount and type of hearing lost is variable.

    Noise

Noise is the cause of approximately half of all cases of hearing loss, causing some degree of problems in 5% of the population globally. Hearing loss due to noise may be temporary, called a 'temporary threshold shift', a reduced sensitivity to sound over a wide frequency range resulting from exposure to a brief but very loud noise like a gunshot, firecracker, jet engine, jackhammer, etc. or to exposure to loud sound over a few hours such as during a pop concert or nightclub session.Louder sounds cause damage in a shorter period of time. Estimation of a "safe" duration of exposure is possible using an exchange rate of 3 dB. As 3 dB represents a doubling of intensity of sound, duration of exposure must be cut in half to maintain the same energy dose.

    Genetic

Hearing loss can be inherited. Around 75–80% of all these cases are inherited by recessive genes, 20–25% are inherited by dominant genes, 1–2% are inherited by X-linked patterns, and fewer than 1% are inherited by mitochondrial inheritance.When looking at the genetics of deafness, there are 2 different forms, syndromic and nonsyndromic. Syndromic deafness occurs when there are other signs or medical problems aside from deafness in an individual. This accounts for around 30% of deaf individuals who are deaf from a genetic standpoint.


Symptoms

  • Trouble understanding phone conversations.
  • Trouble hearing above background noise.
  • Trouble following a conversation when more than one person speaks at once.
  • Perception that people are not speaking clearly or mumbling.
  • Often misunderstanding what people say and responding inappropriately.
  • Ringing, roaring, or hissing sounds in the ears, known as tinnitus.